Are And Were Use?

Can and could grammar?

We use can and can’t to talk about the ability to do something at a specific time in the present or future: I can see you.

We use could and couldn’t to talk about the past: She could speak several languages..

Was or were used with you?

Generally, “was is used for singular objects and “were” is used for plural objects. So, you will use “was” with I, he, she and it while you will use “were” with you, we and they.

What is the meaning of were you?

idiom. —used when giving advice or guidance.

Is has past present or future?

The perfect tenses are made with the helping verb have (have / has / had) plus the verbs past participle. All subjects use had for the past perfect tense. All subjects use will have or shall have for the future perfect tense. The infinitive have or has for singular third person is used for the perfect present tense.

Why do we say if I were?

The reason we use WERE instead of WAS is because the sentence is in the SUBJUNCTIVE mood which is used for hypothetical situations. This is a condition which is contrary to fact or reality (the fact is, I am NOT you). In the subjunctive mood we use IF + I / HE / SHE / IT + WERE for the verb To Be.

Is I wish I were there grammatically correct?

“I wish I was there” means that the speaker wishes (using the present tense: “wish”) that he or she had been (past tense: “was”) at a specific place at a past time. “I wish I were there” means that the speaker wishes (using the subjunctive mood) that he or she is (present tense) at a specific place at the present time.

Are past from?

The past tense of are is were.

When to use was and were?

Was is used in the first person singular (I) and the third person singular (he, she, it). Were is used in the second person singular and plural (you, your, yours) and first and third person plural (we, they).

Are or were past tense?

Meaning – Were is the past tense of the verb are. Look at this example of were used in a sentence. Since were means the same as the past tense of are in this sentence, it is the correct word to use.

Is it correct to say if I were?

If I were you… It will make you sound smarter and it is technically correct since “the subjunctive mood is used to express a wish or possible situation that is currently not true.” It’s if I were for hypothetical in the present or future and if I was when talking about something presumed true in the PAST.

Can we use were with he?

We use “was” with I, he, she, it when speaking of the past: it is the singular past form of the verb “to be”. We use “were” with you and they and we: it is the plural past form. But sometimes we can use “were” with I (he, she, it): I wish I were a sailor.

What tense should I use after if?

It depends on whether you want to emphasize a single moment in time (simple form) or the an extended period of time (-ing form). In either case, use would + verb in the main clause. When the situation is unreal and unlikely, use past tense in the conditional clause and would + verb in the main clause.

Do you say there were or there was?

Answer #1 is correct; use the plural verb, were, because there are multiple toys. In my house, there were many toys. If you were talking about 1 pile of toys though, you would use “was,” the singular verb, because there is 1, single pile.

What is difference between are and were?

Are – is for plural, and present. They are there. Were – also for plural, but for past. They were there a second ago.