Is It If There Was Or If There Were?

How do you use was and were in past tense?

If you want to remember easily, you can think of was/were as the past tense form of the auxiliary verbs am, is and are.

Generally, “was is used for singular objects and “were” is used for plural objects.

So, you will use “was” with I, he, she and it while you will use “were” with you, we and they..

What is the meaning of were you?

idiom. —used when giving advice or guidance.

What is the rule for using was and were?

The common rule that determines how you use “was” and “were” is that singular and plural rule. If the noun is singular, you use was. If the noun is plural, you use were.

When to use the word were in a sentence?

Use “were” as a past tense verb, as the: First-person plural of “be” (We “were” busy last week.) Second-person singular and plural of “be” (You “were” busy last week.) Third-person plural of “be” (They “were” busy last week.)

Are and were difference?

Are – is for plural, and present. They are there. Were – also for plural, but for past. They were there a second ago.

What is the meaning of were?

Were is the past tense of be. An example of were is what a student would say if he was telling his mother that he and his friends had studied yesterday – We were studying yesterday. YourDictionary definition and usage example.

Which is correct grammatically correct if I was or if I were?

“I were” is called the subjunctive mood, and is used when you’re are talking about something that isn’t true or when you wish something was true. If she was feeling sick… <-- It is possible or probable that she was feeling sick. "I was" is for things that could have happened in the past or now.

Has been or have been?

“Has been” and “have been” are both in the present perfect tense. “Has been” is used in the third-person singular and “have been” is used for first- and second-person singular and all plural uses. … “Had been” is the past perfect tense and is used in all cases, singular and plural.

Was is the past tense of is?

The past participle is usually the same as the past tense form. Only some irregular verbs have a past participle that is different than their past tense form….Verb Forms.FormVerbInfinitivebePast tensewas (for I / he / she / it); were (for we / you / they)Past participlebe, beenPresent participlebeing1 more row

What is the difference between there was and there were?

“was” is the singular past tense form of the verb “to be”, while “were” Is the plural of the past tense. So, which one you use would depend on the number of people or things you are talking about. For example: “There was one person at the meeting.”

What is the difference between where were and wear?

Where can be a adverb, conjunction, or pronoun. It has to do with directions. Were is a verb and the past tense of be. Wear is also a verb, but has to do with clothes or fatigue.

When to use are or is?

When deciding whether to use is or are, look at whether the noun is plural or singular. If the noun is singular, use is. If it is plural or there is more than one noun, use are.

Do you say there were or there was?

Answer #1 is correct; use the plural verb, were, because there are multiple toys. … If you were talking about 1 pile of toys though, you would use “was,” the singular verb, because there is 1, single pile. For example: “There was a pile of toys on the living room floor!”

Were a lot or was a lot?

I agree, it has to be “were” because “people” is plural. “A lot” can go either way, though; you can use “was” if the noun is collective, or otherwise singular. “There was a lot of emotion in his performance.”