Question: How Do You Use Advice And Advise In A Sentence?

What does advise mean sentence?

transitive verb.

1a : to give (someone) a recommendation about what should be done : to give advice to Her doctor advised her to try a drier climate.

b : caution, warn advise them of the consequences..

Is it correct to say an advice?

Slightly surprisingly, “advice” is an uncountable (mass) noun in English (like “water” or “sand”), and as such it has no plural form: correct His advice was very helpful. … Since it is uncountable, we cannot say “an advice”.

What is another name for advice?

What is another word for advice?warningcautionlecturedirectionsuggestionenjoinmentinstructionurgingpressurepersuasion15 more rows

What is another word for advise?

SYNONYMS FOR advise 1 counsel, admonish, caution. 2 suggest. 3 inform, notify, apprise, acquaint. 4 confer, deliberate, consult.

What is an advice?

noun. an opinion or recommendation offered as a guide to action, conduct, etc.: I shall act on your advice.

What words can you make with advice?

4 letter words made by unscrambling the letters in adviceaced.acid.aide.avid.cade.cadi.caid.cave.More items…

What is a sentence for affect?

Sentence Examples Will the upgrade affect the performance of the software? Poverty can affect anyone, regardless of age, race, gender or social background. The decision will not affect the validity of the remaining contract provisions. She was in shock after the attack, and it showed in the flat affect on her face.

What are some good advice?

25 Excellent Pieces of Advice That Most People IgnoreTake time to know yourself. “Know thyself” said Aristotle. … A narrow focus brings big results. … Show up fully. … Don’t make assumptions. … Be patient and persistent. … In order to get, you have to give. … Luck comes from hard work. … Be your best at all times.More items…•

What does it mean to give good advice?

an opinion that someone offers you about what you should do or how you should act in a particular situation: She gave me some good advice.

How do you advise others?

Here’s the best way to give advice:Tell a story. Dry information and stats don’t inspire people to make a change or listen to you. … Chunk it down. … Have a good structure. … Be respectful. … Get to the point. … Make it inspirational. … Use your own experience. … Relate your advice back to their problem.More items…•

How do you use advice in a sentence?

Advice sentence examplesThe best advice I can give you is to try to relax. … I decided to follow your advice and take a vacation. … This is the advice received from Acas. … We need the advice of a qualified actuary using the projected unit method. … Howie, I can’t tell you what to do; only give you advice and try to look at the options logically.More items…

How do you use advice and advise?

Advise vs. Advice–What’s the Difference?Advise is a verb that means to suggest what should be done, to recommend, or to give information to someone. The S of advise sounds like a Z.Advice is a noun that means a suggestion about what you should do. The C of advice sounds like S.

What is the difference between advise and advice?

The main difference between ‘advice’ and ‘advise’ is this: advice is a thing (a noun), advise is an action (a verb). They cannot be used interchangeably. I advise you to get some advice about this matter.

How do I ask for advice?

The reason most people don’t follow others’ advice is that they don’t know why and how to ask for help.Use a Positive tone. People are busy. … Provide context. … Be specific about the type of advice. … Let people know how you’ll use their advice. … Be Ready to Be Challenged. … Be thankful. … Close the loop.

How can I advise in English?

Find out with these five simple ways to give advice in English.Use a modal verb. There are two modal verbs we often use for giving advice: ‘should’ and ‘ought to’. … Make it into a question. … Put yourself in the person’s position. … Make a suggestion. … Advise in a stronger way.

What does it mean when you say please advise?

Please advise is a formal request for information, often associated with professional correspondence. The expression is often interpreted as a passive-aggressive phrase in business contexts and tongue-in-cheek in casual contexts.