Question: What Are The 13 Planets In Order?

What are the 13 planets in our solar system?

Order Of the Planets From The SunMercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune.

An easy mnemonic for remembering the order is “My Very Educated Mother Just Served Us Noodles.”Mercury: …

Venus: …

Earth: …

Mars: …

Jupiter: …

Saturn: …

Uranus:More items…•.

Who found the planets?

Five planets have been known since ancient times — Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn. The first new planet discovered was Uranus. It was discovered by the English astronomer Sir William Herschel in 1781. Herschel was one of the first modern astronomers.

What are the 12 planets?

If the resolution is approved, the 12 planets in our solar system listed in order of their proximity to the sun would be Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Ceres, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, Pluto, Charon, and the provisionally named 2003 UB313.

What are the 14 planets?

Solar SystemPlanetary systemDistance to Kuiper cliff50 AUPopulationsStars1 (Sun)Known planets8 (Mercury Venus Earth Mars Jupiter Saturn Uranus Neptune)22 more rows

Is there a 10th planet?

With the exception of some long-period comets, until 2018 VG18 was discovered on December 17, 2018, Eris and Dysnomia were the most distant known natural objects in the Solar System. Because Eris appeared to be larger than Pluto, NASA initially described it as the Solar System’s tenth planet.

What is the most unique planet?

Uranus the unique. Saturn may be flashy and pretty, and Jupiter may be huge and dramatic, but they can’t hold a candle to Uranus’s intrigue. While all the other planets spin like tops around the sun, Uranus lies on its side.

Are there 8 or 9 planets?

The order of the planets in the solar system, starting nearest the sun and working outward is the following: Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune and then the possible Planet Nine. If you insist on including Pluto, it would come after Neptune on the list.

What would happen if the moon broke apart?

If the moon exploded, the night sky would change. We would see more stars in the sky, but we would also see more meteors and experience more meteorites. The position of the Earth in space would change and temperatures and seasons would dramatically alter, and our ocean tides would be much weaker.

What is the most unknown planet?

Planet NinePlanet Nine is a theoretical, undiscovered giant planet in the mysterious far reaches of our solar system. The presence of Planet Nine has been hypothesized to explain everything from the tilt of the sun’s spin axis to the apparent clustering in the orbits of small, icy asteroids beyond Neptune.

What planet is closest to the Earth right now?

MarsHere’s how to see it. Look up! Mars is at its closest to Earth until 2035 today (Oct.

Why is Pluto no longer a planet?

The International Astronomical Union (IAU) downgraded the status of Pluto to that of a dwarf planet because it did not meet the three criteria the IAU uses to define a full-sized planet. Essentially Pluto meets all the criteria except one—it “has not cleared its neighboring region of other objects.”

What is the hottest planet?

VenusVenus is the exception, as its proximity to the Sun and dense atmosphere make it our solar system’s hottest planet.

How many planets are there in the universe?

10,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 planetsFor those of you who like to see gigantic numbers written out in full, around 10,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 planets in our observable Universe, and that’s only counting planets that are orbiting stars.

How many planets are there in 2020?

Constant Contact Use. There are eight planets in the solar system: Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune.

What is Planet 9 called?

This hypothetical Neptune-sized planet orbits our Sun in a highly elongated orbit far beyond Pluto. The object, which the researchers have nicknamed “Planet Nine,” could have a mass about 10 times that of Earth and orbit about 20 times farther from the Sun on average than Neptune.