Question: Who Use Sentences?

Which is the grammatically correct sentence?

In order for a sentence to be grammatically correct, the subject and verb must both be singular or plural.

In other words, the subject and verb must agree with one another in their tense.

If the subject is in plural form, the verb should also be in plur al form (and vice versa)..

What is a good question to ask?

100 Getting to Know You QuestionsWho is your hero?If you could live anywhere, where would it be?What is your biggest fear?What is your favorite family vacation?What would you change about yourself if you could?What really makes you angry?What motivates you to work hard?What is your favorite thing about your career?More items…•

What are examples of questions?

Check out this list of wh- question examples, including who, what, when, where, why, which, and how….Here are some examples of wh questions with what:What is it?What’s this?What’s that?What’s your name?What’s your last name?What’s his name?What’s her name?What day is it today?More items…

Whose or who’s example?

Who’s is a contraction, meaning it’s two words stuck together. The formula: who + is, or who + has. For example: who’s hungry? Whose is a possessive pronoun.

How do we use Why?

Why as a question word We can use why to ask about reasons and explanations: Why did he leave home when he was 16? … We can use why in indirect questions: He asked me why I wanted to leave the job.

Are questions sentences?

Sentences that ask a question are called interrogative sentences. They’re easy to spot -they always end with a question mark (?). But it’s not quite as simple as that. All interrogative sentences are not the same.

What are the 5 question words?

According to the principle of the Five Ws, a report can only be considered complete if it answers these questions starting with an interrogative word:Who is it about?What happened?When did it take place?Where did it take place?Why did it happen?

What are 5 examples of simple sentences?

Examples of simple sentences include the following:Joe waited for the train. “Joe” = subject, “waited” = verb.The train was late. … Mary and Samantha took the bus. … I looked for Mary and Samantha at the bus station. … Mary and Samantha arrived at the bus station early but waited until noon for the bus.

Which at the start of a sentence?

“Which” clauses that appear at the beginning of a sentence or paragraph are likewise incomplete sentences, and you are allowed to use them occasionally.

Why are sentences used?

Why would she want to do that? What have you two been arguing about, and why did you kiss your brother like that? Why does the rain fall?

What words use sentences?

The clause that comes after the word “which” or “that” is the determining factor in deciding which one to use. If the clause is absolutely pertinent to the meaning of the sentence, you use “that.” If you could drop the clause and leave the meaning of the sentence intact, use “which.”