Quick Answer: Can A Sentence Be Started With Since?

When we should use since?

When using since, we normally use present perfect and past perfect tenses in the main clause of the sentence.

You wouldn’t use since when you are talking about the future because, by definition, since refers to specific point in the past..

Do we need to put comma after since?

Use commas after introductory a) clauses, b) phrases, or c) words that come before the main clause. a. Common starter words for introductory clauses that should be followed by a comma include after, although, as, because, if, since, when, while.

What comes after since?

We use the Past tense after “since” when we refer to a point in time in the past, and we use the Present Perfect after “since” when we refer to a period of time from the past until the present.

Which is or that is?

In a defining clause, use that. In non-defining clauses, use which. Remember, which is as disposable as a sandwich bag. If you can remove the clause without destroying the meaning of the sentence, the clause is nonessential and you can use which.

What is had in grammar?

The past perfect is used when two events happened in the past, with one past action having occurred even before the other past action. … To form the past perfect, use had and the past participle of a verb in one part of the sentence.

What is a sentence for since?

I haven’t eaten since breakfast. Since the party, she has not spoken to him at all. The company has been in its present location since the beginning of the century. We’ve been waiting for you since 10 o’clock.

Is since a connective?

b. Subordinating conjunctions (eg when, while, before, after, since, until, if, because, although, that). These go at the beginning of a subordinate clause: We were hungry because we hadn’t eaten all day.

Has been since grammar?

When the main verb in a sentence with a since clause (since you arrived) or a since phrase (since Tuesday) refers to a period of time including the present, a present perfect tense is necessary. C1 See examples B1 – B3. C2 I have been here since Tuesday. C3 Since you arrived, he’s been really happy.

Is I have had correct?

It is correct, though it too might seem a bit awkward. To understand “had had,” we need to take a look at the present perfect and past perfect tenses. Take this sentence: “I have had too many chocolates today.” That sentence is in the present perfect tense.

When to use have had or had?

“Have had” or “have + past participle” is used to create what is called the present perfect tense.”Had had” or “had + past participle” is used to create what is called the past perfect tense.More items…

What is the meaning of since morning?

Since is used with the present perfect tense to say when something began. It has been raining since morning.

Can you use due to start a sentence?

Due to. First off, because due to is essentially synonymous with caused by, it is almost always grammatically incorrect at the beginning of a sentence.

Where we use have had?

Had had is the past perfect form of have when it is used as a main verb to describe our experiences and actions. We use the past perfect when we are talking about the past and want to refer back to an earlier past time, Madiini.

Is since formal?

As and since are more formal than because. We usually put a comma before since after the main clause: … We often use as and since clauses at the beginning of the sentence.

What is the difference between since and because?

Because indicates the reason for something. Since generally refers to time and can be used to mean “after.” It can also imply cause.

Where do we use as in a sentence?

In formal writing, like is used as a preposition, telling where, when or how the noun in the sentence is doing whatever it may be doing. As is used as a conjunction, joining two clauses.

How do you use ever since in a sentence?

1 : continually or often from a past time until now We both liked the idea and have been working on it ever since. I went to the festival its first year and have been returning ever since. 2 : continually from the time in the past when : since She’s wanted to be a firefighter ever since she was a young girl.