Quick Answer: Why Do We Use Were?

What if I was or were?

Use ‘if I was’ for real situations that are in indicative mood.

Used in a subjunctive mood, ‘if I were’ indicates an unreal situation.

Something that can never happen.

You are imagining a situation, that isn’t true yet or cannot be true..

Were True or true?

There is often confusion about were (a past subjunctive) and was (a past indicative) after wish. In conditional sentences where the condition is unreal or not yet real and in that clauses after to wish, use were: I wish it were true that he loved me.

What is the use of were in a sentence?

Meaning – Were is the past tense of the verb are. Look at this example of were used in a sentence. Since were means the same as the past tense of are in this sentence, it is the correct word to use.

Why do we use those?

Generally speaking, we use this/these to refer to people and things, situations and experiences that are close to the speaker or very close in time. We use that/those to refer to people and things, situations and experiences that are more distant, either in time or physically.

Can we say I were?

“I were” is called the subjunctive mood, and is used when you’re are talking about something that isn’t true or when you wish something was true. If she was feeling sick… <-- It is possible or probable that she was feeling sick. "I was" is for things that could have happened in the past or now.

What mean Could?

Could is sometimes considered to be the past form of can1, but in this dictionary the two words are dealt with separately. 1. modal verb. You use could to indicate that someone had the ability to do something. You use could not or couldn’t to say that someone was unable to do something.

Can we use could for future?

The use of ‘could’, ‘would’, or ‘will be’ all imply future tense. The past tense version would be: … “Can” may be used either as future or present tense, but using “is” or “am” almost always implies present tense.

Could is present or past?

The verb can is used to say that someone or something is able to do something. Can is called a modal verb. It doesn’t have all of the tenses that verbs usually have. It has the simple past tense could, but no past participle.

Why do we say if I were?

The reason we use WERE instead of WAS is because the sentence is in the SUBJUNCTIVE mood which is used for hypothetical situations. This is a condition which is contrary to fact or reality (the fact is, I am NOT you). In the subjunctive mood we use IF + I / HE / SHE / IT + WERE for the verb To Be.

Which is correct there was or there were?

Answer #1 is correct; use the plural verb, were, because there are multiple toys. In my house, there were many toys. If you were talking about 1 pile of toys though, you would use “was,” the singular verb, because there is 1, single pile.

Why do we use could?

“Could” is a modal verb used to express possibility or past ability as well as to make suggestions and requests. “Could” is also commonly used in conditional sentences as the conditional form of “can.”

Is it correct to say if I were?

If I were you… It will make you sound smarter and it is technically correct since “the subjunctive mood is used to express a wish or possible situation that is currently not true.” It’s if I were for hypothetical in the present or future and if I was when talking about something presumed true in the PAST.

Is if I were a boy grammatically correct?

You should always use the subjunctive after if to suggest a hypothetical situation e.g. if I were lucky, if it were to rain, if I were a boy, if I were you. But in casual, informal, spoken language, many people use the present tense e.g. if I was lucky, if it was to rain, if I was a boy, if I was you.

Why do we use have with does?

Have – is plural, and has is singular in the present tense. Once you are using – does – as the verb, it means your subject is singular. The uninverted sentence is “It does have”. With singular subject, plural of has (have ) should not be used.

Is you was a correct grammar?

The pronoun “you” is second person, while the verb form “was” is third person, so this combination would be a mismatch. The correct grammatical term is “you were.” You were is correct. Was is the third person singular of the verb to be and is used with the pronouns he, she, it, or one.