What Tense Is After If?

Where we use have had?

In the present perfect, the auxiliary verb is always have (for I, you, we, they) or has (for he, she, it).

In the past perfect, the auxiliary verb is always had.

We use have had in the present perfect when the main verb is also “have”: I’m not feeling well..

Would in if clauses grammar?

We use would in the main clause, not in the conditional clause: If you decided to take the exam, you would have to register by 31 March….Second conditional: form.conditional clausemain clauseif + past simplemodal verb with future-in-the-past meaning (should/would/might/could)1 more row•Oct 21, 2020

Can we use would for future?

Like Simple Future, Future in the Past has two different forms in English: “would” and “was going to.” Although the two forms can sometimes be used interchangeably, they often express two different meanings. Examples: Imagine a sentence such as “I would have to convince her to talk to me”.

When to use have had together in a sentence?

“Have had” or “have + past participle” is used to create what is called the present perfect tense.”Had had” or “had + past participle” is used to create what is called the past perfect tense.More items…

Can you use would after if?

Many writers wonder if it’s equally correct to use “will” or “would” in an if-clause. The short answer is no, but there are exceptions to the rule.

Will and would sentences examples?

For example: I wasn’t hungry, so I said that I would just have an orange juice. It’s the same sentence that we saw with ‘will’, but changed to the past tense. And the last sentence becomes: She said she would send me all the details by email.

Would vs Will future?

The main difference between will and would is that would can be used in the past tense but will cannot. Also, would is commonly used to refer to a future event that may occur under specific conditions, while will is used more generally to refer to future events.

What tense is used after if?

It depends on whether you want to emphasize a single moment in time (simple form) or the an extended period of time (-ing form). In either case, use will + verb in the main clause. When the situation is unreal, but likely, use present tense in the conditional clause and will + verb in the main clause.

Is have had correct?

We use the present perfect tense when we want to connect the present with the (recent) past in some way and this will appear as has had or have had in full forms or as ‘s had or ‘ve had in contracted forms: … Had had is the past perfect form of have when it is used as a main verb to describe our experiences and actions.

Was or were in if clause?

In both sentences above, the “if” clause contains a form of the past tense of the verb. … If the verb in the if clause is “to be,” use “were,” even if the subject of the clause is a third person singular subject (i.e., he, she, it).

Would instead of Will?

would is the past tense form of will. Because it is a past tense, it is used: to talk about the past. to talk about hypotheses (when we imagine something)

Do you use past tense after would?

Technically, would is the past tense of will, but it is an auxiliary verb that has many uses, some of which even express the present tense.

Can vs Can grammar?

Can, like could and would, is used to ask a polite question, but can is only used to ask permission to do or say something (“Can I borrow your car?” “Can I get you something to drink?”). Could is the past tense of can, but it also has uses apart from that–and that is where the confusion lies.

How do you use had had?

The past perfect form of have is had had (had + past participle form of have). The past perfect tense is used when we are talking about the past and want to refer back to an earlier past time. She felt marvelous after she had had a good night’s sleep. They dismissed him before he had had a chance to apologize.