Why Do We Use Were With You?

Is if I were a boy grammatically correct?

You should always use the subjunctive after if to suggest a hypothetical situation e.g.

if I were lucky, if it were to rain, if I were a boy, if I were you.

But in casual, informal, spoken language, many people use the present tense e.g.

if I was lucky, if it was to rain, if I was a boy, if I was you..

What tense should I use after if?

It depends on whether you want to emphasize a single moment in time (simple form) or the an extended period of time (-ing form). In either case, use would + verb in the main clause. When the situation is unreal and unlikely, use past tense in the conditional clause and would + verb in the main clause.

What is the meaning of if I were you?

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary Englishif I were youif I were youspoken used when giving advice and telling someone what you think they should do I wouldn’t worry about it if I were you.

What is correct sentence?

In order for a sentence to be grammatically correct, the subject and verb must both be singular or plural. In other words, the subject and verb must agree with one another in their tense.

What is the meaning of were you?

idiom. —used when giving advice or guidance.

Is the past tense?

The past tense of are is were.

Which is correct grammatically correct if I was or if I were?

“I were” is called the subjunctive mood, and is used when you’re are talking about something that isn’t true or when you wish something was true. If she was feeling sick… <-- It is possible or probable that she was feeling sick. "I was" is for things that could have happened in the past or now.

Why do we use being?

It can be used as a gerund, or in present or past continuous tenses. In a present or past continuous tense, being says that it is happening now, or was happening before, in a continual manner. … Being can also be used as a gerund, a word that acts like a noun and looks like a verb.

Is where you at correct grammar?

A preposition is a fine word to end a sentence with but the “at” in “Where are you at?” (or “At where are you?”) is just incorrect.

Can I use was with you?

Generally, “was is used for singular objects and “were” is used for plural objects. So, you will use “was” with I, he, she and it while you will use “were” with you, we and they. … Even though you are singular, you must use “were”.

What is difference between being and been?

Now, the main difference is that being is the present participle (all present participles end in “–ing”, like swimming, running, learning). On the other hand, been is the past participle (some past participles end in “–ed”, like learned, studied; others are irregular like, run, swum, written, spoken).

Where are you at incorrect grammar?

“Where are you at?” is slang, at least in America, whereas “Where are you?” is the proper way to ask where one is. “Where are you at?” is incorrect, ending a sentence with a preposition is a most grievous sin!

What is mean of been?

past participle of be. intransitive verb. 1a : to equal in meaning : have the same connotation as : symbolize God is love January is the first month let x be 10.

Can we use was with you?

We use “was” with I, he, she, it when speaking of the past: it is the singular past form of the verb “to be”. We use “were” with you and they and we: it is the plural past form. But sometimes we can use “were” with I (he, she, it): I wish I were a sailor.

What is the use of were in a sentence?

Were sentence examples”You were very greedy,” said the girl. … I don’t know where they were planning to sit. … There were sparks between them from the start. … My parents were deeply grieved and perplexed. … They were faithful straight liners.More items…

Why do we say if I were?

The reason we use WERE instead of WAS is because the sentence is in the SUBJUNCTIVE mood which is used for hypothetical situations. This is a condition which is contrary to fact or reality (the fact is, I am NOT you). In the subjunctive mood we use IF + I / HE / SHE / IT + WERE for the verb To Be.

Where do we use been and being?

As a rule, the word “been” is always used after “to have” (in any of its forms, e.g., “has,” “had,” “will have,” “having”). Conversely, the word “being” is never used after “to have.” “Being” is used after “to be” (in any of its forms, e.g., “am,” “is,” “are,” “was,” “were”). Examples: I have been busy.